Exceptions to the Social Security disability rule

| Aug 25, 2020 | Uncategorized |

Social Security Disability payments are usually disbursed once a month to those who are unable to work because of an illness or an injury. The application process typically includes statements from a doctor that offer details about why a person is unable to work during the week. In New York and many other states, recipients of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) can work a certain number of hours each week or month as long as they don’t make over a certain amount of money.

After initially receiving Social Security Disability payments, recipients can go back to work to see if they are able to perform the duties that they did before. Payments are still made during this time until nine months have passed in order for the recipient to determine if the job can be performed with ease. If benefits are less than the amount set forth by the state, then the recipient can usually file for an extension to continue receiving payments. Recipients have five years to get their payments reinstated if they cease due to the individuals working during the trial period.

People who are on disability cannot make over $1,180 from working. There are a few deductions that can be made to offset this amount so that earnings are a bit lower, which could mean that the person can make more money each month. Transportation expenses, including cab services, can be deducted from monthly benefits as well as some utility payments that need to be made that are directly related to a disability.

After the application process is over, a recipient begins receiving Social Security Disability benefits but may not make enough to support his or her family. An attorney can review an individual’s income and his or her monthly expenses to determine if anything can be deducted. A lawyer can also examine the amount of the disability payments to see if any extensions can be applied for after working.